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How The #MeToo Movement Changed Game Of Thrones

Longtime fans of Game of Thrones can attest to the fact that, over time, the series began to show significantly less nudity. But what fans may not know is that the decision to dial down the number of nude scenes was heavily influenced by the #MeToo Movement. In a recent interview with Deadline, Carice Van Houton, the actress who played the Red Priestess Melisandre, opened up about the movement’s impact on the series and how she truly felt about participating in those recurring nude scenes.

“It wasn’t my favourite thing in the world at all,” Van Houten revealed. “… The Dutch are quite open-minded, we’re a bit easier with that. But it’s never comfortable being the only one undressed on set. It was before I had a child. I would be more uncomfortable now. The times have changed in many ways. Back then, it was all a little overwhelming. No one forced me into anything, but in hindsight I might have been a little more cautious with it.”

As the series began to make an obvious shift toward displaying less nudity, it became clear to many people involved that the storyline was strong enough for the show to survive with, well, a lot more clothes. And when asked whether or not this had anything to do with #MeToo and the ever-changing landscape, Carice said, “Yes. It also showed that you don’t need it.”

But even though the nude scenes weren’t Van Houten’s favourite part about her job, there’s a lot she misses about Game of Thrones. And like us, she’s beginning to feel its absence. “For the first time, I’m feeling it,” she said. “There was always a year between shoots so we were used to it, but around now we would be getting into the script again, getting in touch with each other, speculating over what would happen to each other’s characters. I do feel a certain emptiness…” Don’t we all, Carice. Don’t we all.